WWII Veteran, Longtime Darien Resident Gives Estate To HonorBound Foundation

Released: May 23, 2019

DARIEN, Conn., May 23, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — George A. Swisshelm, who fought to liberate Europe from Nazi occupation and then helped combat the spread of communism during the Korean War, will help U.S. military personnel long after his death.

On Memorial Day weekend, as the U.S. salutes the men and women who died while serving in the military, the Darien-based nonprofit HonorBound Foundation has announced that Swisshelm has left his estate to the veterans’ organization.

Swisshelm, a longtime resident of Darien, passed away in April of 2018.

HonorBound Foundation currently assists thousands of American veterans each year who are experiencing financial hardship throughout the United States. The nonprofit was founded in 1978 to help military personnel who had been exposed to the chemical defoliant Agent Orange in Vietnam.

Swisshelm, a longtime resident of Darien, passed away in April of 2018.

HonorBound Foundation currently assists thousands of American veterans each year who are experiencing financial hardship throughout the United States. The nonprofit was founded in 1978 to help military personnel who had been exposed to the chemical defoliant Agent Orange in Vietnam.

Kraft said he talked at length with Swisshelm about the work HonorBound does to assist veterans in need.

“A few weeks later, George called to tell me that he was planning to leave his estate to HonorBound. I was amazed at the extent of his generosity. His gift will help struggling veterans for years to come,” Kraft said.

Swisshelm was a member of the U.S. Army during World War II. After returning from Europe, Swisshelm graduated from Columbia University and went to work shortly thereafter as an associate editor at NBC. While working at NBC, Swisshelm was one of 35 employees that were members of the NBC-sponsored Army Reserve Unit that was activated in 1951 for military service in Korea.

Following his service in Korea, Swisshelm moved to Darien in 1958 and lived in the community until his death. He also was a generous supporter of other local charities.

Kraft said HonorBound Foundation is honored to be able to carry on Swisshelm’s legacy by helping veterans.